Hornets (hymenoptera, vespinae) living at simulated high altitude: The combined effects of low pressure, hypoxia, light, hyperkinesis and drugs on behavior and survival

Jacob S. Ishay*, Joseph P. Ribak, Yehoshua Noy-Man, Dan M. Avgar, Michael E. Shirin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

1. 1. Hornets (adults and brood) were maintained at simulated high altitudes of 8,540 meters and 13,000 meters for 10 and 6 days, respectively, in static or kinetic (vertical centrifugation) conditions, under 3 different intensities of illumination and fed on drugs (caffeine, theophylline, allopurinol and diphenylhydantoin). 2. 2. Factors which contributed to abbreviation of their life-span were: (a) kinetic conditions; (b) intense illumination; (c) low atmospheric pressure and low partial oxygen tension; (d) Addition of xanthines to the food, but not of allopurinol or diphenylhydantoin; (e) development of stages with a high oxygen requirement. 3. 3. Queens were more long-lived than males, and both more than workers. In several instances workers lost their natural gravity-directed orientation as evidenced from their building inverse combs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-272
Number of pages6
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part A: Physiology
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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