Hemodynamic changes determine the efficacy of thrombolysis: Results from an in-vitro flow model

Ran Kornowski, Lev Mendelevich, Uri Zaretsky, Shmuel Einav, Shlomo Laniado, Gad Keren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy might be influenced by changes in the hemodynamic status. The aim of the study was to examine whether changes in perfusion pressure could affect the time to reflow in an in-vitro model. Methods. The in-vitro flow system comprised flexible plastic tubes that enclosed a blood clot formed in one of the circuit arms. Streptokinase (125,000 U) or saline (control) was injected from a proximal side branch to induce thrombolysis. The protocol comprised four treatments: A, perfusion pressure 150/90 mmHg with streptokinase infusion; B, perfusion pressure 150/90 mmHg with saline; C, perfusion pressure 120/60 mmHg with streptokinase; D, perfusion pressure 120/60 mmHg with saline. Reflow was defined as flow restoration determined by the ultrasonic flowmeter. Results. Successful recanalization was obtained in six of six samples subjected to treatment A (100%), two of seven samples subjected to treatment B (28%), three of five samples subjected to treatment C (60%) and none of six samples subjected to treatment D (0%). Time to reflow was 23 ± 11 min with treatment A, 76 ± 24 min with treatment B, 66 ± 25 min with treatment C, and > 90 min with treatment D. Conclusions. Our data suggest that the hemodynamic status determines the efficacy of streptokinase-induced thrombolysis, and that spontaneous clot lysis is more likely to occur at greater perfusion pressures. It is conceivable that the hypotensive reaction induced by streptokinase in the clinical setting may adversely affect angiographic patency, compared with that observed with other lytic agents such as tissue-type plasminogen activator.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-48
Number of pages6
JournalCoronary Artery Disease
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Thrombolysis
  • Thrombus

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