Helping is not enough: Recipient's reactions to aid as a function of positive and negative information about the self

Arie Nadler*, Avram Altman, Jeffrey D. Fisher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present research investigated the effects of experimentally induced positive and negative feedback about the self on the recipient's subsequent reactions to aid. In line with a consistency prediction, subjects given positive feedback who later received aid had lower mood ratings and less favorable self‐evaluations than those who were given positive feedback but no subsequent help. Conversely, subjects given negative feedback who later received aid had higher mood ratings and more positive self‐evaluations than those who were given negative feedback but no subsequent help. Subjects' evaluations of another individual were characterized by aid main effects, which indicate that an other who helped was evaluated more favorably than an other who did not help. The conceptual and applied implications of these results are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-628
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1979

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