Has king david’s palace in jerusalem been found?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recent excavations at the City of David have revealed a set of massive walls constructed of large undressed stones. Excavator Eilat Mazar has presented them as the remains of a single building, which she labelled the 'Large Stone Structure'. Mazar interpreted the 'Large Stone Structure' as part of a big construction complex, which had also included the 'Stepped Stone Structure' on the slope. She dated her 'Large Stone Structure' to ca. 1000 BCE and identified it as the palace of King David. We argue that: (1) the walls unearthed by Mazar do not belong to a single building; (2) the more elaborate walls may be associated with elements uncovered by A1acalister and Duncan in the 1920s and should possibly be dated to the Hellenistic period; (3) the 'Stepped Stone Structure' represents at least two phases of construction—the lower (downslope) and earlier, possibly dating to the Iron IIA in the 9th century BCE, and the later (which connects to the Hasmonaean First Wall upslope) dating to the Hellenistic period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-164
Number of pages23
JournalTel Aviv
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

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