Habitat selection and home range in the Blanford's fox, Vulpes cana: compatibility with the resource dispersion hypothesis

Eli Geffen*, Reuven Hefner, David W. Macdonald, Michal Ucko

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents analyses of habitat-use and home range size in the Blanford's fox. We predicted, from the resource dispersion hypothesis (RDH), that home ranges would encompass similar areas of combined fruitful habitats, but widely different areas of useless habitats, and thus that home ranges would be larger where such fruitful patches are fragmented and widely dispersed. Home range estimates of 0.5-2.0 km2 were calculated for 16 adult Blanford's foxes, using three different methods. There were no significant differences in home range size between sexes or study sites. One habitat, dry creekbed, was the most frequently visited in all home ranges. Dry creekbed provided abundant prey for the foxes and only sparse cover for their predators. Both the available area of creekbed in each range, and the area of creekbed patches that was used by the foxes, were independent of home range size. However, the variance in home range size was explained by the mean distance between the main denning area and the most frequently used patches of creekbed. These results are in accord with some predictions of the resource dispersion hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-81
Number of pages7
JournalOecologia
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blanford's fox
  • Food patch
  • Habitat selection
  • Home range
  • Resource dispersion hypothesis

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