Green perspective for a hopeful future: Explaining green schools' contribution to environmental subjective well-being

Dorit Kerret, Hod Orkibi*, Tammie Ronen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article offers a new perspective on 2 of the most pressing challenges of contemporary society: improving the state of the environment and improving the subjective well-being (SWB) of adolescents, who are not only likely to suffer the severe consequences of environmental degradation but are also society's future leaders. We present an innovative interdisciplinary approach blending positive psychology with environmental education to study the previously unexplored mechanisms by which green schools may promote not only adolescents' environmental behavior (EB) but also their SWB. Within a new framework of environmental subjective well-being, our explanatory theoretical model posits a potential chain of influence that begins with green schools' effects on students' goal-directed environmental hope (a latent cognitive variable indicated by agency thinking, pathway thinking, and trusting other members of society), which in turn contributes to increased levels of EB and SWB. A latent cognitive-behavioral variable, indicated by self-control skills and resistance to peer pressure, is posited as moderator of the relation between environmental hope and actual EB. Implications for research, practice, and policy are proposed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-88
Number of pages7
JournalReview of General Psychology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Environmental behavior
  • Green schools
  • Hope
  • Peer pressure
  • Self-control
  • Subjective well-being

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