Gingival recession in young adults: Occurrence, severity, and relationship to past orthodontic treatment and oral piercing

Shimshon Slutzkey, Liran Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Gingival recession can be localized or generalized and associated with at least 1 tooth surface. As a result, gingival recession leads to root surface exposure, often causing esthetic impairment, fear of tooth loss, increased susceptibility for root caries, and dentin hypersensitivity. The prevalence, extent, and severity of gingival recession in a young adult Israeli population were evaluated, and the relationship between orthodontic therapy and other potential risk indicators and gingival recession was assessed. Methods: Our cohort included 303 consecutive healthy patients who had routine dental examinations at a military dental center. Information was collected regarding age, smoking habits, oral piercing, oral hygiene habits, and past orthodontic treatment. Clinical examination included visible gingival inflammation, visible dental plaque, and gingival recession on the facial aspects of all teeth. Results: Gingival recession was found in 14.6% of the subjects and in 1.6% of all examined teeth. The prevalence, extent, and severity of recession correlated with past orthodontic treatment. A negative correlation was found between plaque on the buccal tooth aspect and gingival recession. There was no correlation between gingivitis or smoking habits and recession. Prevalence was related to oral piercing. Conclusions: Gingival recession is not uncommon in young adults and is related to past orthodontic treatment and oral piercing. Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment or about to pierce the tongue or lips should be advised regarding these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)652-656
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume134
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

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