Genetic variations in the heparanase gene (HPSE) associate with increased risk of GVHD following allogeneic stem cell transplantation: Effect of discrepancy between recipients and donors

Olga Ostrovsky, Avichai Shimoni, Avital Rand, Israel Vlodavsky, Arnon Nagler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is the most common cause of nonrelapse mortality and morbidity after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The welldocumented involvement of heparanase in the process of inflammation and autoimmunity led us to investigate an association between HPSE gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the risk of GVHD. The present study indicates a highly significant correlation of HPSE gene SNPs rs4693608 and rs4364254 and their combination with the risk of developing acute GVHD. Moreover, the study revealed that discrepancy between recipient and donor in these SNPs may elevate significantly the risk of acute GVHD. This association was statistically significant when the recipients possessed genotype combinations dictating higher levels of heparanase compared with their human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched donors. In addition, HPSE gene SNPs disclosed a correlation with extensive chronic GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and overall survival. Our study indicates involvement of heparanase in the development of acute and extensive chronic GVHD. Moreover, it suggests a possible mechanism for the aggressive behavior of T lymphocytes leading to GVHD when the recipients possess genotype combinations that dictate high levels of heparanase mRNA compared with their HLA matched donors expressing low levels of heparanase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2319-2328
Number of pages10
JournalBlood
Volume115
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 18 Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

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