Gating or switching? Gating is a better model of prospective timing (a response to 'switching or gating?' by Lejeune)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lejeune (1998) (Switching or gating? The attentional challenge in cognitive models of psychological time. Behav. Process. 44, 127-45) analyzed and compared two models of prospective timing: the classical switching model and the attentional-gate model. Lejeune argued that a modified switch notion, which can be opened and closed in a frequency which reflects the amount of attentional resources allocated for timing can provide a satisfactory explanation for the impact of attention on prospective timing, and therefore the notion of an 'attentional switch' is favored over adding an 'attentional gate.' In the present analysis, the two competing models are compared in terms of correspondence with the nature of attentional processes, as well as in terms of logical analysis and explanatory power. Based on this comparison, it is argued that gating is a better model of prospective timing than switching. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalBehavioural Processes
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 Jul 2000

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Gating
  • Prospective timing
  • Switching

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