Gait abnormalities in patients with chronic ankle instability can improve following a non-invasive biomechanical therapy: A retrospective analysis

Shay Tenenbaum, Ofir Chechik, Jason Bariteau, Nathan Bruck, Yiftah Beer, Mazen Falah, Ganit Segal, Amit Mor*, Avi Elbaz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in gait patterns and clinical outcomes of patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) following treatment with a home-based non-invasive biomechanical device. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three patients with CAI were compared with 43 healthy controls. Patients underwent a spatiotemporal gait assessment before and three months following treatment. Clinical evaluation was recorded with SF-36 Health Survey and the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). [Results] Significant baseline differences were found between groups. Patients with CAI showed a statistically significant improvement in velocity, cadence, symptomatic limb step length and single limb support over time. Significant improvements in SF-36 PCS and FAOS outcome scores were found in patients with CAI. [Conclusion] Patients with CAI have baseline spatiotemporal gait abnormalities as compared with healthy controls. However, clinical and gait metrics improvement can be expected after 12 weeks of perturbation training using a non-invasive biomechanical device.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-684
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Physical Therapy Science
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biomechanical device
  • Neuromuscular control
  • Walking patterns

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