Frozen-Thawed embryo transfer success rate is affected by age and ovarian response at oocyte aspiration regardless of blasto- mere survival rate

Yuval Bdolah, Roni Zemet, Einat Aizenman, Francine Lossos, Tali Bdolah Abram, Yoel Shufaro*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To identify the factors influencing the success of frozen-thawed embryo transfers, whether originating directly from current cycles or from their matching fresh cycles. Methods: Analysis of 273 frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles and their matching fresh embryo transfer cycles, with respect to maternal, embryological and clinical factors, comparing successful to unsuccessful cycles. Results: The cumulative clinical pregnancy and live birth rates following fresh ET and corresponding FETs were 50.5% and 38.8%, respectively. No outcome measure differed between fresh and frozen ET’s. Only maternal age, number of oocytes retrieved and fertilized, and number of cleaved embryos in the fresh cycle were correlated with a higher pregnancy or live birth rate in the FET cycle. None of the other parameters had any effect on the outcome. Pre-freezing embryo quality and blastomere survival rate had no effect on pregnancy/live birth rates. Conclusion: Clinical pregnancy and live birth rates of fresh and frozen ETs were not significantly different. The only parameters that affected FET success were those resulting from the patient’s age and ovarian reserve at the time of oocyte aspiration. Post-thawing blastomere survival rate and type of endometrial preparation for FET did not affect the success rate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-215
Number of pages6
JournalJornal Brasileiro de Reproducao Assistida
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Frozen thawed embryo transfer
  • Reproductive outcomes

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