Frequency and Prognostic Significance of Pericarditis Following Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated by Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

Massimo Imazio, Alessandro Negro, Riccardo Belli, Federico Beqaraj, Davide Forno, Massimo Giammaria, Rita Trinchero, Yehuda Adler, David Spodick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prospective data were collected from 743 consecutive patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (mean age 65.3 ± 11.6 years, 36.7% women). Early post-AMI pericarditis was diagnosed in 31 patients (4.2%; mean age 62.1 ± 13.4 years, 41.9% women), with an increasing prevalence according to presentation delay (p <0.001): 1.7% for <3 hours, 5.4% for 3 to 6 hours, and 13.6% for >6 hours. Late post-AMI pericarditis (Dressler syndrome) was recorded in only 1 patient (0.1%). On multivariate analysis, patients with presentation times >6 hours (odds ratio 4.4, 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 9.8, p <0.001) and primary percutaneous coronary intervention failure (odds ratio 2.8, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 7.4, p = 0.032) were at increased risk for developing early post-AMI pericarditis. Although pericarditis is associated with a larger infarct size, in-hospital and 1-year mortality and major adverse cardiac events were similar in patients with and without pericarditis. In conclusion, early primary percutaneous coronary intervention may reduce the occurrence of early post-AMI pericarditis within the first 3 hours of symptom onset. Early post-AMI pericarditis remains a marker of larger infarct size but without independent prognostic significance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1525-1529
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume103
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

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