Follow-up of victims of one terrorist attack in Israel: ASD, PTSD and the perceived threat of Iraqi missile attacks

Ilan Kutz, Rachel Dekel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The first aim of the study was to examine the relationships between acute stress reactions and post-traumatic reactions following exposure to a terrorist attack. The second was to examine whether exposure to a terrorist attack increases the perceived threat and fear of renewed Iraqi missile attacks. Data were collected at two points in time: during the first month after the exposure to a terrorist attack (N = 54), and four months later (N = 44). Twenty-four percent of the exposed group had acute stress disorder (ASD), and a similar percentage had PTSD. Among participants who had ASD, the chances of developing PTSD were three times greater than among those who had never experienced ASD. Among participants who had been exposed to a terrorist attack and developed PTSD, the perceived threat of an Iraqi missile attack was greater than among those who had been exposed to a terrorist attack but did not develop PTSD, or among the participants in the control group. The discussion deals with the findings in light of the current controversy regarding ASD and the current situation in Israel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1579-1589
Number of pages11
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ASD
  • Follow-up
  • PTSD
  • Perceived threat
  • Terror

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