Filamentous bacterial viruses break down amyloid plaques in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease - A novel therapeutic avenue

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The current dominant theory of Alzheimer's disease (AD) etiology and pathogenesis is related to the amyloid cascade hypothesis which states that overproduction of amyloid-beta-peptide (AβP), or failure to clear this peptide, leads to Alzheimer's disease primarily through amyloid deposition, presumed to be involved in neurofibrillary tangles formation [1], Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque formation, one of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, is a complex kinetic and thermodynamic process [2]. The dependence of AβP polymerization on peptide-peptide interactions to form a β- pleated sheet fibril, and the stimulatory influence of other proteins on the reaction suggest that amyloid formation can be modulated. Here we describe recent data on the use of filamentous phage as a delivery vector of anti-AβP antibodies which interfere with amyloid plaque formation [3], as well as novel therapeutics for disaggregation of amyloid plaques, towards a better alternative to existing attempts to treat AD.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTechnical Proceedings of the 2009 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2009
Pages123-126
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2009
EventNanotechnology 2009: Life Sciences, Medicine, Diagnostics, Bio Materials and Composites - 2009 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2009 - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: 3 May 20097 May 2009

Publication series

NameTechnical Proceedings of the 2009 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2009
Volume2

Conference

ConferenceNanotechnology 2009: Life Sciences, Medicine, Diagnostics, Bio Materials and Composites - 2009 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2009
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityHouston, TX
Period3/05/097/05/09

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyloid plaques
  • Brain delivery vector
  • Filamentous phages

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Filamentous bacterial viruses break down amyloid plaques in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease - A novel therapeutic avenue'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this