Femtosecond laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) yields better results than transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (Trans-PRK) for correction of low to moderate grade myopia

Assaf Gershoni, Olga Reitblat, Michael Mimouni, Eitan Livny, Yoav Nahum, Irit Bahar*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (Trans-PRK) with femtosecond laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) for the correction of low to moderate myopia. Methods: A retrospective cohort study design was used. The study group included patients with myopia less than −6.0 D, with or without concomitant astigmatism under 2.0 D, who were treated with FS-LASIK or Trans-PRK in 2013 through 2014. Background, clinical and outcome data were collected from the patient files. A comparison between eyes treated with FS-LASIK or Trans-PRK was performed. Results: The Trans-PRK group was comprised of 1793 eyes and the FS-LASIK group of 666 eyes. Mean ± SD spherical equivalent (SE) refraction prior to surgery was −3.43 ± 1.27 D in the Trans-PRK group and −3.18 ± 1.34 D in the FS-LASIK group (p < 0.001). Efficacy index values were 0.95 ± 0.14 in the Trans-PRK group and 0.98 ± 0.12 in the FS-LASIK group (p < 0.001), and corresponding safety index values were 0.96 ± 0.13 and 0.99 ± 0.12 (p < 0.001). Distance from target refraction was 0.45 ± 0.42 D in Trans-PRK group and 0.43 ± 0.38 D in the FS-LASIK group (p = 0.537); 71.6% and 74.2% of eyes were within ±0.5 D of attempted correction, respectively (p = 0.193) Conclusions: Both Trans-PRK and FS-LASIK demonstrated excellent results, mostly comparable with the current literature. FS-LASIK achieved better results than Trans-PRK surgery in the efficacy and safety parameters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2914-2922
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Corneal procedures for myopia
  • complications of refractive surgery
  • corneal optics
  • laser biophysics
  • optics/refraction/instruments
  • refractive surgery

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