Familial Mediterranean fever and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome: Two diseases with distinct clinical, serologic, and genetic features

Avi Livneh, Joost P.H. Drenth, Ina S. Klasen, Pnina Langevitz, Jacob George, David A. Shelton, Deborah L. Gumucio, Elon Pras, Daniel L. Kastner, Mordechai Pras, Jos W.M. Van Der Meer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. To determine whether the 2 periodic febrile syndromes familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS) are distinct diseases. Methods. Clinical manifestations of the diseases were analyzed by physicians experienced with FMF and HIDS. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels were studied in 70 patients with FMF using nephelometry or ELISA and compared with Ig levels in 50 patients with HIDS. Genetic linkage of HIDS with the chromosome 16 polymorphic locus RT70, currently used for refined localization of the FMF susceptibility gene (MEFV), was studied in 9 HIDS families (18 patients) using polymerase chain reaction amplification and gel electrophoresis. Results. The main clinical features distinguishing FMF from HIDS were lymphadenopathy, skin eruption, and symmetrical oligoarthritis in HIDS, and monoarthritis, peritonitis, and pleuritis in FMF. Increased IgG levels were found in 12 patients with FMF (17%), IgA in 16 (23%), IgM in 9 (13%), and IgD in 9 (13%), significantly lower than the prevalence reported for HIDS. We found no evidence for genetic linkage between HIDS and the chromosome 16 marker RT70. Conclusion. HIDS and FMF are different entities, clinically, immunologically, and genetically.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1558-1563
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume24
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1997

Keywords

  • IgA
  • IgD
  • MEFV
  • chromosome 16
  • familial Mediterranean fever
  • hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome

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