Factors associated with self-evaluated severity of illness and quality of life in male Israeli asthmatic soldiers

D. Stein, O. Luria, R. Tarrasch, L. Goldstein, G. Raviv, A. Weizman, Y. Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate whether the asthmatic condition and quality of life of male asthmatic Israeli soldiers deteriorate during army service. Method: We retrospectively assessed 178 asthmatic soldiers during service using an adapted version of the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, and compared it to their condition before service. The participants responded additionally to questionnaires assessing psychosocial resources and adjustment to illness. Results: The self-evaluated degree of asthma disease severity (SEDOAD) of the participants deteriorated in the army compared to before service. Soldiers with mild SEDOAD during service, compared to soldiers with severe (and in most cases also moderate) SEDOAD, had less severe medically evaluated and self-evaluated asthma before service. Mild SEDOAD participants showed, additionally, lower inclination towards active seeking of asthma-related information, more favorable health care-related attitudes, less unfavorable effects of their illness on military and extra-military functioning, greater reported pre-enlistment optimism, and a greater belief in their ability to cope successfully with their asthma during service. Conclusion: SEDOAD and the quality of life during service are associated not only with pre-enlistment asthma severity, but also with the manner in which the soldier perceives the influence of the illness on his health condition, and the manner in which he copes with this influence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)915-924
Number of pages10
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

Keywords

  • Army
  • Asthma
  • Psychosocial adjustment
  • Quality of life

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