Exploring the acute affective responses to resistance training: A comparison of the predetermined and the estimated repetitions to failure approaches

Hadar Schwartz, Aviv Emanuel, Isaac Isur Rozen Samukas, Israel Halperin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background In resistance-training (RT), the number of repetitions is traditionally prescribed using a predetermined approach (e.g., three sets of 10 repetitions). An emerging alternative is the estimated repetitions to failure (ERF) approach (e.g., terminating sets two repetitions from failure). Despite the importance of affective responses experienced during RT, a comparison between the two approaches on such outcomes is lacking. Methods Twenty women (age range: 23-45 years) without RT experience completed estimated one repetition maximum (RM) tests in four exercises. In the next two counterbalanced sessions, participants performed the exercises using 70%1RM. Participants completed ten repetitions in all three sets (predetermined condition) or terminated the sets when perceived to be two repetitions away from task-failure (ERF condition). Primary outcomes were affectivevalence, enjoyment, and approach-preference and secondary outcomes were repetitionnumbers completed in each exercise. Results We observed trivial differences in the subjective measures and an approximately even approach-preference split. Under the ERF condition, we observed greater variability in repetition- numbers between participants and across exercises. Specifically, the mean number of repetitions was slightly lower in the chest-press, knee-extension, and lat-pulldown (∼1 repetition) but considerably higher in the leg-press (17 vs. 10, p<0.01). Conclusions Both approaches led to comparable affective responses and to an approximately even approach preference. Hence, prior to prescribing either approach, coaches should consider trainee's preferences. Moreover, under the ERF condition participants completed a dissimilar number of repetitions across exercises while presumably reaching a similar proximity to task-failure. This finding suggests that ERF allows for better effort regulation between exercises.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0256231
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume16
Issue number8 August
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

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