Exome sequencing identified mutations in CASK and MYBPC3 as the cause of a complex dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype

Eyal Reinstein, Shay Tzur, Concetta Bormans, Doron M. Behar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Whole-exome sequencing for clinical applications is now an integral part of medical genetics practice. Though most studies are performed in order to establish diagnoses in individuals with rare and clinically unrecognizable disorders, due to the constantly decreasing costs and commercial availability, whole-exome sequencing has gradually become the initial tool to study patients with clinically recognized disorders when more than one gene is responsible for the phenotype or in complex phenotypes, when variants in more than one gene can be the cause for the disease. Here we report a patient presenting with a complex phenotype consisting of severe, adult-onset, dilated cardiomyopathy, hearing loss and developmental delay, in which exome sequencing revealed two genetic variants that are inherited from a healthy mother: a novel missense variant in the CASK gene, mutations in which cause a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations, and a second variant, in MYBPC3, that is associated with hereditary cardiomyopathy. We conclude that although the potential for co-occurrence of rare diseases is higher when analyzing undefined phenotypes in consanguineous families, it should also be given consideration in the genetic evaluation of complex phenotypes in non-consanguineous families.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere8
JournalGenetical Research
Volume98
DOIs
StatePublished - 13 May 2016

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