Excavations at Rogem Gannim, Jerusalem: Installations of the Iron Age, persian, Roman and Islamic periods

Raphael Greenberg*, Gilad Cinamon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Some five kilometers west of ancient Jerusalem lies a large Iron Age tumulus. At the base of this tumulus, rock-cut installations were uncovered, including winepresses, caves and cisterns. The winepresses were first executed during the Iron Age, resembling the type that prevailed in the region west of Jerusalem during that time. The pottery and small finds from the Iron Age/Persian period included mainly storage jars, with a relative abundance of stamped jar handles, alluding to the economical activity at the site. Following the site's abandonment at the end of the Persian period, a rural settlement was established during the Early Roman period; its inhabitants had engaged in industrial activity, reusing the ancient facilities. Later, sporadic activity at the site occurred during the Early Islamic period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-106
Number of pages28
JournalAtiqot
Volume66
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Administration
  • Agricultural hinterland
  • Jerusalem
  • Wine production

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