Evaluation of Accuracy and Agreement of Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Interpretation of Common Retinal Findings and Diagnoses

Tamar Rabinovitch, Veronika Yehezkeli, Dafna Goldenberg, Anat Loewenstein, Elad Moisseiev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and agreement of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) interpretation in cases of common retinal findings and diagnoses, and to evaluate the effect of OCT B-scans on OCTA interpretations. Methods: This is a case series consisting of a questionnaire with 8 cases demonstrating common retinal conditions of normal, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). Each case included OCTA images, and 58 participants were asked to identify retinal findings and provide a diagnosis. Following OCTA interpretation, the corresponding OCT B-scans were revealed and the participants were asked again to identify retinal findings and provide a diagnosis. The rates of accuracy and agreement for each condition were analyzed. Results: Overall the rates of accurate diagnosis and identification of retinal findings were 37.4 and 61.6%, respectively. Following addition of the OCT B-scans, the rates increased to 61.6 and 79.4%, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). A significant improvement in correct interpretation occurred in the normal and AMD cases, but not in the DR cases. There was no correlation with length of experience or self-reported familiarity with OCTA. Discussion: Considerable variability exists in OCTA interpretation, with mediocre rates of accuracy and agreement between clinicians. Increased familiarity as well as future automation advances will be needed to improve OCTA interpretation accuracy and uniformity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-149
Number of pages9
JournalOphthalmologica
Volume244
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

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