Ethnic differences in temporomandibular disorders between Jewish and Arab populations in Israel according to RDC/TMD evaluation

Shoshana Reiter*, Ilana Eli, Anat Gavish, Ephraim Winocur

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: To use the Axis I and Axis II test items of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) to study the differences in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) between Israeli Arabs and Israeli Jews. Methods: Sixty-five Israeli Jews and 50 Israeli Arabs who were referred with a proposed diagnosis of TMD participated in the study. Results: The overall male:female ratio was 1:7.3 in the Israeli Arab group compared with 1:2.4 in the Israeli Jewish group, with a significant difference in gender between groups (P < .05). A comparison of women only in both groups (44 Israeli Arab women and 46 Israeli Jewish women) revealed no statistically significant differences in Axis I diagnoses, disability days, pain duration, and Characteristic Pain Intensity scores. The Israeli Arab women scored higher in Axis II parameters: Differences between the 2 groups were statistically significant with respect to depression scores (P < .001), anxiety scores (P < .001), somatization scores (pain items excluded) (P < .001), somatization scores (pain items included) (P < .05), average disability scores (P < .01), and chronic pain grade (P < .05). Conclusion: The results highlight the social component of the biopsychosocial model in sculpturing chronic pain behavior. Our research suggests the possible need for cross-cultural calibration of the Axis II assessment tools of the RDC/TMD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Orofacial Pain
Volume20
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Cross-cultural comparison
  • Culture
  • Ethnicity
  • Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders

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