Ethiopian and Israeli students' adjustment to college: The effect of the family, social support and individual coping styles

A. Ben-David, R. Leichtentritt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study examines the individual, family, and social resources that influence the academic adjustment of Ethiopian students as compared to Israeli students. More specifically, the study examines the influence of sense of coherence, coping styles, family cohesion and adaptability, and social support on the academic adjustment of these two populations. Academic adjustment was measured using three dimensions: (a) the student's assessment of his competence and ability in learning; (b) the student's satisfaction in his studies; and (c) the student's grade point average (GPA) during his first year in college (this component was used only for the Ethiopian students). Forty-six Ethiopian and 46 matched Israeli students participated in the study. Results indicate that there are significant differences between the two populations that influence their academic adjustment. Findings are discussed in light of previous knowledge of the Ethiopian community in Israel, as well as the process of adjustment of foreign and racially different students to college.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-313
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Comparative Family Studies
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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