Esophageal anatomy and function in laparoscopic gastric restrictive bariatric surgery: Implications for patient selection

Robert J. Greenstein*, A. Nissan, B. Jaffin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess factors of clinical importance in morbidly obese patients having a laparoscopically adjustable gastric band (LAP-BAND®) implanted in order to achieve weight loss. Methods: Preoperative evaluation of hiatus hernia and esophageal (dys)motility were compared with the need for reoperation. Results are presented for the first 50 consecutive patients entered. Results: Nine of the first 50 patients required reoperation (18%). Five (10%) were for LAP-BAND slippage on the stomach. Of these five, reoperation was required in four of 12 (33%) with hiatus hernia (P = 0.0093); three of nine (33%) with a motility disorder (P = 0.025); and three of six (50%) with both hiatus hernia and a motility disorder (P = 0.0076). Conclusions: We identify two factors, hiatus hernia and esophageal dysmotility, which are associated, both independently as well as in combination, with reoperation for LAP-BAND® slippage. Both patients and their physicians should consider these data when considering the LAP-BAND® as possible therapy for morbid obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-206
Number of pages8
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Esophageal motility
  • Gastric banding
  • Hiatus hernia
  • Laparoscopy
  • Morbid obesity
  • Surgery

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