Errors in mutagenesis and the benefit of cell-to-cell signalling in the evolution of stress-induced mutagenesis

Eynat Dellus-Gur, Yoav Ram, Lilach Hadany*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stress-induced mutagenesis is a widely observed phenomenon. Theoretical models have shown that stress-induced mutagenesis can be favoured by natural selection due to the beneficial mutations it generates. These models, however, assumed an error-free regulation of mutation rate in response to stress. Here, we explore the effects of errors in the regulation of mutagenesis on the evolution of stress-induced mutagenesis, and consider the role of cell-to-cell signalling. Using theoretical models, we show (i) that stress-induced mutagenesis can be disadvantageous if errors are common; and (ii) that cell-to-cell signalling can allow stress-induced mutagenesis to be favoured by selection even when error rates are high. We conclude that cell-to-cell signalling can facilitate the evolution of stress-induced mutagenesis in microbes through second-order selection.

Original languageEnglish
Article number170529
JournalRoyal Society Open Science
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Funding

FundersFunder number
Israel Science Foundation1568/13

    Keywords

    • Cell-to-cell signalling
    • Populations models
    • Regulation errors
    • Stress-induced mutagenesis

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