Endoscopic sinus surgery for dental implant displacement into the maxillary sinus—a retrospective clinical study

A. Safadi, O. J. Ungar, I. Oz, I. Koren, A. Abergel, S. Kleinman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aims of this retrospective clinical study were to present our management protocol for the retrieval of impacted dental implants that have become displaced into the maxillary sinus cavity and to define the role of endoscopic sinus surgery in this setting. All 24 patients (25 implants) who underwent surgical retrieval of dental implants displaced into the maxillary sinus between 2012 and 2019 were included. Data on surgical interventions and complications were collected retrospectively. Eleven patients (46%) had chronic sinusitis associated with the migrated implant. All implants were successfully retrieved via transnasal endoscopic approach alone: 80% via a middle meatal antrostomy and 20% via a combined middle and inferior meatal antrostomy. Five patients required a concomitant transoral approach for oro-antral fistula repair. None required a transoral approach for displaced implant retrieval. All patients healed uneventfully without complications. Transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery via a middle meatal antrostomy or a combined middle and inferior antrostomy is recommended as the primary choice for dental implant retrieval from the maxillary sinus. A transoral approach should be performed simultaneously only for oro-antral fistula repair. This surgical protocol proved to be safe and efficient, and it obviated the need for osteotomies of the anterolateral maxillary wall.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)966-972
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • dental implants
  • endoscopic sinus surgery
  • odontogenic sinusitis

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