Emotional distress and marital adjustment of caregivers: Contribution of level of impairment and appraised burden

Rachel Dekel, Zahava Solomon, Avi Bleich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study examined the relative contribution of both the husband's impairment and the caregiver's sense of burden to the caregiver level of emotional distress and marital adjustment. Two hundred and fifteen veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and their wives participated in the study. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires and a series of clinical interviews with the veterans and their wives. Results indicated that spouses of PTSD veterans suffer from a higher level of emotional distress and a lower level of marital adjustment than the general population. Their level of distress is more closely associated with perceived caregiver burden than with the level of the veterans' impairment. The discussion highlights some cross-cultural similarities of the findings and the clinical and empirical implications of the study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-82
Number of pages12
JournalAnxiety, Stress and Coping
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Caregiver burden
  • Distress
  • PTSD
  • War veterans
  • Wives

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