Elevated diastolic, but not systolic, blood pressure measured in the emergency department predicts future development of hypertension in normotensive individuals

Shachaf Shiber-Ofer*, Zipora Shohat, Alon Grossman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Elevated blood pressure (BP) is reported in many individuals without hypertension presenting to the emergency department (ED). Whether this condition represents a transient state or is predictive for the development of future hypertension is unknown. This observational prospective study investigated patients admitted to an ED without a diagnosis of hypertension in whom BP values were ≥140/90 mm Hg. The primary outcome was development of hypertension during follow-up. Overall, 195 patients were recruited and at the end of follow-up (average 30.14±15.96 months), 142 patients were diagnosed with hypertension (73%). The mean age (50±12.25 vs 48.31±13.9, P=419) and sex distribution (78 men/64 women vs 24 men/20 women, respectively; P=148) were similar in both groups. There were significant differences in systolic and diastolic BP between those who developed hypertension on follow-up and those who did not (177.6 mm Hg±22.6/106.1 mm Hg±16.9 vs 168.6 mm Hg±18/95.2 mm Hg±12.2; P=011 for systolic BP, P<001 for diastolic BP). In multivariate analysis the only significant predictive factor for the development of hypertension was diastolic hypertension recorded in the ED (P=03). Elevated diastolic, but not systolic, BP among patients presenting to the ED is associated with future development of hypertension in previously normotensive individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-363
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2015

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