Electronic memory aids for community-dwelling elderly persons: Attitudes, preferences, and potential utilization

Jiska Cohen-Mansfield*, Michael A. Creedon, Thomas B. Malone, Mark J. Kirkpatrick, Lisa A. Dutra, Randy Perse Herman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article focuses on the attitudes of community-dwelling elderly persons toward the use of electronic memory aids. Questionnaire data from 100 elderly volunteers indicate that more than one half were interested in an electronic memory device for at least one purpose. Those who said that they would use the device had higher levels of education, used more household electronic devices, were more likely to have someone available to help them use a device, and had more health problems than those who preferred to not use it. Most would use a memory aid to monitor medications and remember appointments, followed by remembering addresses and phone numbers. The expected use, design, preferred methods of instruction, and concerns about the device varied. Study results suggest the need to develop devices with different degrees of flexibility and complexity. Future studies should evaluate training methods to use such technology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-20
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assistive technology
  • Devices
  • Medication adherence
  • Technology attitudes
  • Training for technology use

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