Electrical impedance spectroscopy of plant cells in aqueous buffer media over a wide frequency range of 4 Hz to 20 GHz

Kian Kadan-Jamal, Marios Sophocleous, Aakash Jog, Dayananda Desagani, Orian Teig-Sussholz, Julius Georgiou, Adi Avni, Yosi Shacham-Diamand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Electrical impedance spectroscopy was performed on suspensions of plant cells in aqueous buffer media over a wide frequency range of 4 Hz to 20 GHz. Custom probes were designed, manufactured, and used for these investigations. Experiments were performed with a custom-made parallel plate probe and impedance analysers in the low-frequency range (4 Hz to 5 MHz), with a custom-made coaxial airline probe and a vector network analyser in the mid-frequency range (100 kHz to 3 GHz), and with a commercial open-ended probe and a vector network analyser in the high-frequency range (200 MHz to 20 GHz). The impedance data acquired were processed in order to eliminate the effects of parasitics and compensate for geometrical differences between the three probes. Following this, the data were fitted to a unified model consisting of the Randles and Debye models. The data were also normalized to a reference measurement, in order to accentuate the effects of cell concentration on the impedance of the suspensions. • The methodology allows for impedance spectroscopy of cell suspensions over a wide frequency range spanning 10 orders of magnitude. • It allows for compensation of parasitics and of geometrical variations between probes, using mathematical techniques

Original languageEnglish
Article number101185
JournalMethodsX
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)
  • Electrical spectroscopy of cell suspensions over a wide frequency range
  • Equivalent circuit
  • MSK8
  • Plant cells
  • Vector network analyser (VNA)

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