Effects of short-term treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) or ethinyl estradiol on the pituitary responsiveness to gnrh

Daniel Rozenman, Daniel Ayalon*, Nachman Eckstein, Alexander Eshel, Moshe Lancet

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 4 patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea, the pituitary responsiveness to an intravenous challenge of 20 μg synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was evaluated before and following a 3-days treatment course with GnRH (100 μg/per day i.m.) or ethinyl estradiol. (100 μg/day orally). The amenorrheic patients all had normal or reduced levels of serum gonadotropins, no evidence of galactorrhea and no other endocrine abnormality. Following GnRH treatment basal luteinizing hormone levels as well as the luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone responses to GnRH were markedly reduced when compared with responses to GnRH before the treatment. Responses to GnRH were significantly augmented after treatment with estrogens. In patients with previous treatment with GnRH the augmented estrogen-induced LH response to GnRH was abolished. These preliminary results support the pathophysiological concept that in amenorrheic patients with hypothalamic dysfunction long-term administration of GnRH docs not result in an improvement but rather in a deterioration of pituitary gonadotropic function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-159
Number of pages13
JournalGynecologic and Obstetric Investigation
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983

Keywords

  • Ethinyl estradiol
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone
  • Hypothalamic amenorrhea
  • Pituitary responsiveness

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