EFFECTS OF PHOTON FLUENCE RATE AND LIGHT SPECTRUM COMPOSITION ON GROWTH, PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND PIGMENT RELATIONS IN GRACILARIA SP.

Sven Beer, Israel Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The optimal photon fluence rate for growth of tha llus tips of Gracilaria sp. was low (about 100 μE·–2·1); higher photon fluence rates inhibited growth. Both phycoerythrin (PE) and chlorophyll (chl) contents decreased with increasing photon fluence rates (up to 100 μE·–m–2s–1) in a fashion inverse to the growth response. Chl/PE ratios varied directly as the growth response over a larger photon fluence rate range. The peak chl/PE ratios were obtained at a photon fluence rate optimal for growth, suggesting that this parameter may be used to estimate in situ growth rates. A low compensation point (about 7 μE·–2s–1) was observed for low light (15 μE·–2s–1) grown plants. This compensation point was also obtained for growth in the long–term (5–6 weeks) experiments. Plants grown at 60 and 140 μE·–2s–1 showed higher light compensation and saturation points, suggesting that the variations in pigment composition found between the different treatments determine the photosynthetic responses at sub–optimal photon fluence rates. Photosynthetic rates at light saturation were the same, on a biomass basis, for plants grown at the various photon fluence rates. Thus, the photosynthetic dark reactions were not influenced by previous light regimes. It is suggested that maximal photosynthetic rates expressed on a biomass basis better reflect the potential productivity at tight saturation than if expressed on a pigment basis. Gracilaria sp. grew better under non–filtered fluorescent and greenish than under reddish and blue–enriched light of equal and sub–optimal photon, fluence rate. However, the pigment relations of the algae did not change in a direction complementary to the light composition at which they grew. This, together with the relatively higher photosynthetic rates under reddish and blueish light for plants previously grown under reddish and blueish light, suggests that adaptations to variouslight spectra are based on mechanisms different from complementary chromatic adaptation of the pigments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)516-522
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Phycology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1983

Keywords

  • Gracilaria
  • growth
  • light
  • photosynthesis
  • pigments

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