Effects of controllability, predictability, and information-seeking style on interest in predictive genetic testing

Shoshana Shiloh, Ronit Ben-Sinai, Giora Keinan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The combined contribution of personal style (monitoring) and situational factors (control and certainty) on seeking predictive genetic testing was investigated. Participants were 209 individuals who were randomly divided into four groups; each group offered one hypothetical genetic test characterized by different degrees of controllability and certainty. Participants' monitoring information-seeking style was measured by the Miller Behavioral Styles Scale (MBSS) and the Threatening Medical Situations Inventory (TMSI), which is a measure specific for medical situations. The authors found that high monitors were generally more interested than low monitors in testing and that this general tendency was especially pronounced under conditions of high certainty/low control. Tests that provide control were generally preferred to tests that do not by high and low monitors alike, whereas tests that provide certainty were preferred to those that do not only by high monitors. These findings were interpreted as indicating similarities and differences in the needs that information about threats fulfills for high and low monitors as well as identifying conditions that limit information-seeking by high monitors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1187-1195
Number of pages9
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999

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