Effectiveness and safety of nitrous oxide as a sedative agent at 60% and 70% compared to 50% concentration in pediatric dentistry setting

Johny Kharouba, Mostafa Somri, Christopher Hadjittofi, Jomana Hasan, Sigalit Blumer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Sedation using 50% nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration is common in pediatric dentistry. The aim to assess sedation and cooperation levels following sedation with 60% and 70% N2O concentrations in children whose dental treatment failed using 50% N2O concentration. Study design: Children (n=51) aged 5-10 years were included. Sedation started with N2O concentration of 50%; when appropriate cooperation and sedation were not achieved, N2O concentration was increased to 60%, and subsequently to 70% during the same session. Sedation and cooperation levels were the primary outcomes. Adverse events were defined as secondary outcomes. Results: At 50% N2O concentration, five children reached adequate sedation and cooperation and completed their dental treatment, where 32 children completed the treatment at 60% N2O concentration. Fourteen children required a concentration of 70% to complete treatment. For ten of the latter, treatment was successfully completed, while for four, treatment failed, despite the achievement of adequate sedation. Adverse events were observed in 9%, 22%, of the children who received 60%, 70% N2O concentrations, respectively. Conclusions: When sedation with 50% N2O concentration does not achieve satisfactory cooperation to complete pediatric dental treatment, 60% N2O concentration appears to be more effective than 50% and safer than 70%.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-65
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Cooperation
  • Nitrous oxide
  • Pediatric dentistry
  • Sedative agent

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