Effect of the metabolic syndrome and hyperuricemia on outcome in patients with coronary artery disease (from the bezafibrate infarction prevention study)

Yafim Brodov, Shlomo Behar, Valentina Boyko, Pierre Chouraqui*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hyperuricemia appears to be related to metabolic syndrome (MS), but its impact on cardiovascular risk in patients with MS is unclear. We evaluated the impact of hyperuricemia on cardiovascular risk in patients with MS. Of 2,963 patients with coronary artery disease enrolled in the Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention study, 1,410 had MS, as established by the presence of <3 of the following 5 criteria: serum fasting glucose >110 mg/dl, triglycerides >150 mg/dl, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <40 mg/dl in men and <50 mg/dl in women, systolic and diastolic blood pressures >130 and 80 mm Hg, respectively, and body mass index >28 kg/m2. The remaining 1,553 patients had no MS. Primary end points were defined as occurrence of acute myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death. Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid levels >7.0 mg/dl in men and >6.0 mg/dl in women, respectively. Higher rate of primary end point was noted in hyperuricemic patients (n = 284) versus normouricemic patients (n = 1,126) with MS (20.1% and 15.3%, respectively, p = 0.05). After adjustment for age, gender, smoking, diabetes, previous myocardial infarction, hypertension, New York Heart Association classes II to IV, estimated glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, total cholesterol, triglycerides, diuretics, antiplatelets, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β blockers, and bezafibrate treatment, hyperuricemic patients with MS demonstrated significantly higher risk for the primary end point compared to normouricemic patients with MS (hazard ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 2.17, p = 0.05). In conclusion, hyperuricemia is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in patients with MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1717-1720
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume106
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Dec 2010

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