Effect of raloxifene on the ovarian circulation in women after menopause.

Arie L. Lidor, Shlomo B. Cohen, Daniel S. Seidman, Ilya Novikov, Jaron Rabinovici, Shlomo Mashiach, Shlomo Lipitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether raloxifene effects the ovarian circulation in women after menopause. STUDY DESIGN: The resistance indices of the ovarian blood flow were assessed in 130 women after menopause who were randomly assigned to receive either 60 mg of raloxifene, a continuous combined estrogen-progestin tablet daily, or neither treatment for 24 months. RESULTS: The women who received raloxifene or hormonal replacement therapy had a significant time-related decrease in the resistance index of the ovarian artery blood flow compared to baseline values (resistance index, 0.91) starting after 12 and 18 months of treatment (resistance index, 0.88 and 0.89, respectively; P <.002 and.001, respectively). Whereas significant increases in the resistance index respective to the prestudy values were observed in the nontreated women at 24 months (resistance index, 0.93; P <.0001). The mean (+/-SD) resistance index of the ovarian blood flow at the end of the study (resistance index, 0.89) was significantly lower in the women who were treated with raloxifene than in the women who were treated with hormone replacement therapy (P <.002). No changes in the ovarian dimensions or appearance were noticed during the entire study. CONCLUSION: Daily therapy with raloxifene has significant ovarian vascular-relaxing effect in women after menopause. This potentially important direct vasculoprotective long-term effect of raloxifene on cardiovascular disease deserves further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)984-989
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume186
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2002
Externally publishedYes

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