Education: Teaching pharmacogenomics to prepare future physicians and researchers for personalized medicine

David Gurwitz*, Abraham Weizman, Moshe Rehavi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The vision of personalized medicine, the practice of medicine where each patient receives the most appropriate medical treatments and the most fitting dosage and combination of drugs based on his or her genetic make-up, seems to become more realistic as our knowledge about the human genome rapidly expands. We already know the reason for many types of adverse drug reactions, which are often related to polymorphic gene alleles of drug metabolizing enzymes. Moreover, insight into reasons for poor drug efficacy, often related to single nucleotide polymorphisms or larger polymorphisms in genes encoding drug target proteins, has been gained. There is a growing need to incorporate this increasingly complex body of knowledge to the standard curriculum of medical schools, so that the forthcoming generation of clinicians and researchers will be familiar with the latest developments in pharmacogenomics and medical bioinformatics, and will be capable of providing patients with the expected benefits of personalized medicine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-125
Number of pages4
JournalTrends in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2003

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