Early postoperative intraocular pressure pattern in glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous patients

A. Barak*, H. Desatnik, T. Ma-Naim, I. Ashkenasi, A. Neufeld, S. Melamed

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate intraocular pressure (IOP) changes in the 24 hours following cataract extraction in glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous patients. Setting: General Eye Service and Glaucoma Service of the Goldschleger Eye Institute, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Methods: Twenty-six nonglaucomatous patients and 13 glaucomatous patients scheduled for routine cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation were evaluated. In each patient, IOP was measured before cataract surgery and every 4 hours for 24 hours postoperatively. Thirteen of the nonglaucomatous patients were randomly treated with one drop of timolol maleate at the end of surgery (NG-T group). The other 13 nonglaucomatous patients (NG group) and all glaucoma patients (G group) were not treated. Results: In the NG group, mean preoperative IOP was 13.9 mm Hg. Following surgery, IOP rose steadily to 22.2 mm Hg at 12 hours; it returned to almost presurgical levels at 24 hours. The IOP exceeded 35 mm Hg in only one patient. In the NG-T group, mean preoperative IOP was 16.5 mm Hg and increased to 21.2 mm Hg at 12 hours. The IOP returned to almost presurgical levels at 24 hours. In the G group, mean IOP was 18.8 mm Hg preoperatively and rose to 29.9 mm Hg at 8 hours after surgery. In seven eyes the IOP exceeded 35 mm Hg. Comments: Our findings of elevated IOP emphasize the need for prophylactic treatment (medical or combined cataract and glaucoma surgery) to prevent IOP spikes in high-risk patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)607-611
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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