Early administration of protein in critically ill patients: A retrospective cohort study

Itai Bendavid*, Oren Zusman, Ilya Kagan, Miriam Theilla, Jonathan Cohen, Pierre Singer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It is currently uncertain whether early administration of protein improves patient outcomes. We examined mortality rates of critically ill patients receiving early compared to late protein administration. This was a retrospective cohort study of mixed ICU patients receiving enteral or parenteral nutritional support. Patients receiving >0.7 g/kg/d protein within the first 3 days were considered the early protein group and those receiving less were considered the late protein group. The latter were subdivided into late-low group (LL) who received a low protein intake (<0.7 g/kg/d) throughout their stay and the late-high group (LH) who received higher doses (>0.7 g/kg/d) of protein following their first 3 days of admission. The outcome measure was all-cause mortality 60 days after admission. Of the 2253 patients included in the study, 371 (36%) in the early group, and 517 (43%) in the late-high group had died (p < 0.001 for difference). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, while controlling for confounders, early protein administration was associated with increased survival (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.71–0.97, p = 0.017). Administration of protein early in the course of critical illness appears to be associated with improved survival in a mixed ICU population, even after adjusting for confounding variables.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Critically ill
  • Early
  • Mortality
  • Nutrition
  • Protein

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