DRUG addiction: A computational multiscale model combining neuropsychology, cognition and behavior

Yariv Z. Levy, Dino Levy, Jerrold S. Meyer, Hava T. Siegelmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

According to the United Nations, approximately 24.7 million people used amphetamines, 16 million used cocaine, and 12 million used heroin in 2006/07 (Costa, 2008). Full recovery from drug addiction by chemical treatment and/or social and psychological support is uncertain. The present investigation was undertaken to expand our understanding of the factors that drive the dynamics of addiction. A new multiscale computational model is presented which integrates current theories of addiction, unlike previous models, considers addiction as a reversible process (Siegelmann, 2008). Explicit time dependency is added to the inhibition and the compulsion processes. Preliminary computational predictions of drug-seeking behavior are presented and potential correlation with experimental data is discussed. Validation of the model appears promising, however additional investigation is required.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBIOSIGNALS 2009 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing
Pages87-94
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event2nd International Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing, BIOSIGNALS 2009 - Porto, Portugal
Duration: 14 Jan 200917 Jan 2009

Publication series

NameBIOSIGNALS 2009 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing

Conference

Conference2nd International Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing, BIOSIGNALS 2009
Country/TerritoryPortugal
CityPorto
Period14/01/0917/01/09

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Behavioral Processes
  • Bio-signal Modeling
  • Cognitive Processes
  • Multiscale Modeling
  • Neuro-physiological Processes

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