Domestic stress and well-being of employed women: Interplay between demands and decision control at home

Talma Kushnir, Samuel Melamed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Family researchers have suggested that shared decision control is important for coping with stressful demands at home, whereas occupational stress theorists view personal decision control as an essential coping resource. We studied the effects of home demands, personal decision control, and shared decision control at home on burnout and satisfaction with life, using Karasek's job-demands-control model to gauge home stress and its outcomes. Participants were 133 mothers employed in secretarial and managerial jobs. We hypothesized that shared control would correlate more strongly with burnout and satisfaction with life than would personal control. In multiple regression analyses, demands had independent main effects on both outcomes. Shared control significantly predicted satisfaction with life, but not burnout, and personal control predicted neither. It is suggested that in families (as in teams), shared decision control may be a more potent coping resource than personal control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)687-694
Number of pages8
JournalSex Roles
Volume54
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Demands
  • Home stress
  • Shared control

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