Does work engagement increase after a short respite? The role of job involvement as a double-edged sword

Jana Kühnel, Sabine Sonnentag, Mina Westman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study extends research on work engagement by examining how a short respite and general job involvement contribute to work engagement. We gathered questionnaire data from 156 nurses before and after a short respite. Results indicated an increase of work engagement after the respite. Structural equation modelling showed that nurses who experienced psychological detachment from work during the respite showed a higher increase of work engagement. Moreover, nurses who indicated higher job involvement also showed a higher increase of work engagement. Contradictory to this direct positive effect job involvement had on change in work engagement, job involvement exerted a negative indirect effect on change in work engagement by impaired psychological detachment during the respite. Hence, job involvement acted as a double-edged sword for the increase of work engagement. Practical implications for the organization of short respites and suggestions for future research on recovery processes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-594
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

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