Does Malignancy Status Effect Outcomes in Patients With Large Vessel Occlusion Stroke and Cancer Who Underwent Endovascular Thrombectomy?

Fatma Shalabi, Tzvika Sacagiu, Asaf Honig, Jeremy Molad, Zeev Itsekson-Hayosh, Hen Hallevi, David Orion, Shorooq Aladin, John M. Gomori, Jose E. Cohen, Ronen R. Leker*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cancer is associated with an increased risk of acute ischemic stroke, including large vessel occlusions. Whether cancer status affects outcomes in patients with large vessel occlusions that undergo endovascular thrombectomy remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: All consecutive patients undergoing endovascular thrombectomy for large vessel occlusions were recruited into a prospective ongoing multicenter database, and the data were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with active cancer were compared with patients with cancer in remission. Association of cancer status with 90-day functional outcome and mortality were calculated in multivariable analyses. We identified 154 patients with cancer and large vessel occlusions that underwent endovascular thrombectomy (mean age, 74±11; 43% men; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 15). Of the included patients, 70 (46%) had a remote history of cancer or cancer in remission, and 84 (54%) had active disease. Outcome data at 90 days poststroke were available for 138 patients (90%) and was classified as favorable in 53 (38%). Patients with active cancer were younger and more often smoked but did not significantly differ from those without malignancy in other risk factors, stroke severity, stroke subtype, or procedural variables. Favorable outcome rates among patients with active cancer did not significantly differ compared with those seen in patients without active cancer, but mortality rates were significantly higher among patients with active cancer on univariate and multivariable analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that endovascular thrombectomy is safe and efficacious in patients with history of malignancy as well as in those with active cancer at the time of stroke onset, although mortality rates are higher among patients with active cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere029635
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume12
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023
Externally publishedYes

Funding

FundersFunder number
Peritz and Chantal Scheinberg Cerebrovascular Research Fund

    Keywords

    • cancer
    • stroke
    • thrombectomy

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