Does government matter? The impact of occupational retraining, gender and ethnicity on immigrants' incorporation

Miri Lerner*, Gila Menahem, Robert D. Hisrich

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose - Aims to examine the effect of government intervention programs in improving the occupational opportunities of new immigrants as self-employed entrepreneurs or salaried employees, and to determine the effect, if any, of gender and ethnicity. Design/methodology/approach - To examine the effects of two major types of government programs - retraining courses and support for business creation - a sample of 1,195 immigrants from the former Soviet Union in Israel were interviewed in depth on two different occasions. Findings - The findings indicate that the impact of both government programs was more pronounced for women immigrants and immigrants from the Asian republics. Research limitations/implications - The study focuses only on two government programs in one country - Israel. Practical implications - In terms of immigrant incorporation into a society, government programs matter and matter more for disadvantaged groups. Participation in these programs helps diminish any gaps created by market forces. Originality/value - This study adds to the immigration literature on state intervention by assessing the contribution of government programs and intervention to immigrants' occupational incorporation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-210
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Small Business and Enterprise Development
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Keywords

  • Entrepreneurs
  • Government policy
  • Immigrants
  • Israel
  • Retraining

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