Does complete revascularization by the conventional method truly provide the best possible results? Analysis of results and comparison with revascularization of infarct-prone segments (systematic segmental myocardial revascularization): The Sheba study

J. Lavee, S. Rath, Tran-Quang-Hoa, P. Ra'anani, A. Ruder, M. Modan, H. N. Neufeld, D. A. Goor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Myocardial revascularization is usually considered 'complete' if all stenosed major coronaries are bypassed. Attempts were made to compare the results of this method with an approach by which each of the following five left ventricular infact-prone segments is revascularized if ischemic: anteroseptal, anterolateral, posterosuperior, posteroinferior, and diaphragmatic. Two subsets of patients were studied. A total of 366 patients (Group A) who underwent aortacoronary bypass operations from 1980 to 1982 were followed op for a mean of 16.3 (6 to 43) months and were retrospectively divided into two groups: Group A1 (120 patients) had incomplete segmental revasculariation (mean of 3.4 grafts per patient) and Group A2 (246 patients) had complete segmental revascularization (4.0 grafts per patient) (p < 0.0001). Groups A1 and A2 were identical in all clinical and angiographic parameters: unstable angina, 60%; previous myocardial infarction, 70%; left main stenosis, 10%; and ejection fraction <30%, 2%. Overall oparative mortality was 2.3%. Results in Groups A1 and A2, respectively, were as follows: operative mortality, 5.8% versus 0.8% (p < 0.005); perioperative myocardial infarction, 6.9% versus 0.8% (p < 0.0005); 35 month survival rate, 93.3% versus 97.9% (p < 0.02); total freedom from symptoms, 54.1% versus 68.3% (p < 0.025). In addition, 151 patients operated on in 1984 (Group B) were studied prospectively with regard to operative mortality and perioperative myocardial infarction, and the results were identical to those in Group A. Compared to conventional complete revascularization, complete segmental revascularization provides better results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-290
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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