Do interventions bringing current self-care practices into greater correspondence with those performed premorbidly benefit the person with dementia? A pilot study

Jiska Cohen-Mansfield, Barbara Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article assessed whether bringing current self-care practices into greater correspondence with those performed before the onset of dementia benefits the dementia patient. Participants were 20 nursing home residents with dementia, their spouses, and nursing assistants. Past and current self-care routines were determined by proxy responses of spouses and nursing assistants, respectively, using the Self-maintenance Habits and Preferences in Elderly questionnaire. Interventions were proposed based on current practices that were inconsistent with those practiced in the past and that had been important to residents. Residents showed engagement with the interventions, as these resulted in significantly more positive than negative or neutral responses. There was no effect on agitation. Incorporating prior preferences into care routines can contribute to the quality of life of dementia patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)312-317
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Nonpharmacological interventions
  • Preferences
  • Self-care

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