Divergent effects of nicotine administration on cytokine levels in rat small bowel mucosa, colonic mucosa, and blood

Rami Eliakim, Fanny Karmeli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Chronic nicotine administration has a dual effect on bowel disease: augmentation of jejunitis and amelioration of colitis. We previously showed that chronic nicotine administration has divergent regional effects on small bowel and colonic mucosal mediators and blood flow. Objectives: To examine tne effects of nicotine administration on cytokine levels in informal rat small bowel mucosa, colohic mucosa, and blood. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g were given nicotine (12.5 μg/ml) that was dissolved in tap water. Rats were sacrificed on days 1, 2, 7 and 14 after nicotine initiation; blood was withdrawn, and small bowel and colon were resected, washed and weighed. Mucosal scrapings were extracted in 2 ml Krebs-Hemselest buffer for determination of interieukins-2, 6 and 10 using the Biosource International Immunoassay Kit. Results: Nicotine decreased IL-10 and increased IL-6 levels in small bvowel mucosa (from 3.5 ± 0.5 to 0.4 ± 0.1 pg/ml and from 1.9 ± 0.4 pg/ml respectively; P < 0.05). Nicotine decreased IL-2 levels in the colon (from 15.8 ± 3.0 to 7.9 ± 1.0 pg/ml; P < 0.05), having no effect on IL-10 or IL-6 levels. Rats treated, with nicotine had lower IL-6 and IL-2 blood levels compared to control rats, Conclusions: Nicotine has different regional effects on small bowel and colonic cytokine mucosal levels, which might explain some of its opposite effects on small bowel and colonic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-180
Number of pages3
JournalIsrael Medical Association Journal
Volume5
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Colon
  • Interleukin-10
  • Interleukin-2
  • Interleukin-6
  • Nicotine
  • Small bowel

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Divergent effects of nicotine administration on cytokine levels in rat small bowel mucosa, colonic mucosa, and blood'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this