Discrete solitons in zigzag waveguide arrays with different types of linear mixing between nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor couplings

Jinzhou Hu, Shulan Li, Zhaopin Chen, Jiantao Lü, Bin Liu, Yongyao Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We study discrete solitons in zigzag discrete waveguide arrays with different types of linear mixing between nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor couplings. The waveguide array is constructed from two layers of one-dimensional (1D) waveguide arrays arranged in zigzag form. If we alternately label the number of waveguides between the two layers, the cross-layer couplings (which couple one waveguide in one layer with two adjacent waveguides in the other layer) construct the nearest-neighbor couplings, while the couplings that couple this waveguide with the two nearest-neighbor waveguides in the same layer, i.e., self-layer couplings, contribute the next-nearest-neighbor couplings. Two families of discrete solitons are found when these couplings feature different types of linear mixing. As the total power is increased, a phase transition of the second kind occurs for discrete solitons in one type of setting, which is formed when the nearest-neighbor coupling and next-nearest-neighbor coupling feature positive and negative linear mixing, respectively. The mobilities and collisions of these two families of solitons are discussed systematically throughout the paper, revealing that the width of the soliton plays an important role in its motion. Moreover, the phase transition strongly influences the motions and collisions of the solitons.

Original languageEnglish
Article number126448
JournalPhysics Letters, Section A: General, Atomic and Solid State Physics
Volume384
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation
  • Nonlinear dynamics
  • Soliton

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Discrete solitons in zigzag waveguide arrays with different types of linear mixing between nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor couplings'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this