Discrepancies between perceptions of first-grade students at risk for learning disabilities, their parents and teachers

Evguenia Shilshtein, Malka Margalit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study compared discrepancies between children’s academic and social self-perceptions and parents’ and teachers’ perceptions of children’s academic and social competence among 89 first-grade children: 45 children at risk for learning disabilities (RLD) and 44 of typically developing peers (TD). The relationship between self-perceptions among the two groups of children and their significant adults‘ perceptions were compared. The children with RLD reported lower academic self-perception, but did not report lower social self-concept. The discrepancies between students’, parents’ and teachers’ perceptions of students’ academic and social competence were found only for the RLD group. Parents and teachers rated children with RLD as demonstrating lower levels of academic competence. Only teachers rated children with RLD as demonstrating lower levels of social competence. No significant differences were found among children and their significant adults for the comparison group. A serial-multiple mediation analysis presented the relationship model and emphasized the critical mediating role of teachers and parents in predicting children’s academic self-concept. The educational implications of the results call for sensitizing teachers and parents to their perceptions, and to develop empowering intervention with a focused awareness to the impact of their perceptions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)702-711
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Special Needs Education
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Academic self-concept
  • children at risk for Specific learning disabilities (SLD)
  • social self-concept

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