Diffracting trees (preliminary version)

Nir Shavit, Asaph Zemach

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Shared counters are among the most basic coordination structures in multiprocessor computation, with applications ranging from barrier synchronization to dynamic load balancing. Introduced in this paper are diffracting trees, novel distributed-parallel data structures for shared counting. Diffracting trees combine a randomized coordination method together with a combinatorial data structure, to yeild a logarithmic depth counter that improves on the log2 depth of counting networks, and overcomes the resiliency drawbacks of combining trees. Empirical evidence collected on a simulated distributed shared-memory multiprocessor shows that diffracting trees substantially outperform both combining trees and counting networks, currently the most effective known methods for shared counting. Not only do diffracting trees have higher throughput and lower latency, but unlike any known technique, their latency remains almost constant as the number of processors increases.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 6th Annual ACM Symposium on Parallel Algorithms and Architectures, SPAA 1994
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages167-176
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)0897916719, 9780897916714
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 1994
Event6th Annual ACM Symposium on Parallel Algorithms and Architectures, SPAA 1994 - Cape May, United States
Duration: 27 Jun 199429 Jun 1994

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 6th Annual ACM Symposium on Parallel Algorithms and Architectures, SPAA 1994

Conference

Conference6th Annual ACM Symposium on Parallel Algorithms and Architectures, SPAA 1994
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityCape May
Period27/06/9429/06/94

Keywords

  • Concurrent Data Structures
  • Counting Networks
  • Load Balancing
  • Randomization
  • Shared Counters

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Diffracting trees (preliminary version)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this